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The Ice Storm - Shared screen with speaker view
Laure-Anne Bosselaar
52:18
Let’s talk about the challenge of enjambed rhymes!
Gretchen Primack
52:20
CONGRATS, MEG!
Gretchen Primack
52:43
Great to hear you read.
Jonathan Spinner
52:52
What is most incredible is not the use of form but the beauty of the poetry. Brava!
Jimmy Pappas
52:55
Here in Fiji, the ocean is rising. Can formal poems cover topics like climate change? Has it been done successfully?
Megan Leduke
53:01
Congratulations, Meg! What an incredible accomplishment and a STUNNING reading. I am floored.
Laure-Anne Bosselaar
53:01
It’s so good to see you Cornelius.
Maureen Keyes
53:20
Beautiful Meg! I am so impressed.
Carol Owens Campbell
53:29
What a joy to celebrate Meg and THE ICE STORM! Congratulations! It’s great to see Cornelius again! Love to all.
Kathleen Aguero
53:48
Beautiful!
Christine Rhein
53:52
Wonderful book. Wonderful reading. Wonderful discussion.
Ellen Austin-Li
54:00
I wonder if you started with the final sonnet?
Melinda Thomsen
54:07
Love it! Thank you, Meg!
Lisa Charnock
54:09
Could you give us one or more examples of where the form gave you a surprise that affected the course of the poem? Wonderful poems and reading!!
Kyle Potvin
54:12
Meg, a brilliant sequence! Just as you find surprise in each sonnet, I’m sure you found it in the evolution of the crown. Did you go back to tweak the sonnets once you saw the “final” work to build foreshadowing, etc.?
Rebecca Connors
54:32
Like Ellen asked, I am curious where you started -- at the first sonnet or the last...
Rebecca Connors
54:38
and CONGRATS!
Gabriel Cleveland
55:22
Hey there, Meg! So glad to be part of this - thanks for a great reading! Question: after working so hard on The Ice Storm, did you find that you just lapsed into the sonnet form in future poems incidentally? When I wrote a crown,(inspired by The Ice Storm!) several years ago, I think I caught what I call "the Sonnet Curse," where a lot of what I try to write becomes a sonnet without me wanting it to... am I the only one?
Gabriel Cleveland
55:32
Stand alone lines are so important!
Lindsey Applegarth
55:34
Question: If I write in form and then the forms become half-forms in which I change it up in all poems in a collection, do you feel the change-up becomes ineffective or does it become its own form?
Molly Peacock
55:43
Thank you so so much Meg and Cornelius! It’s so marvelous to hear these poems. Thank you also to Cristopher for publishing such a beautiful book. Hello to my idol Linda Pastan and hello to Andrea Carter Brown and Christine Rhein and Howard Levy and so many others here! I never wrote sonnet 15 first. Yikes!
Barbara Bald
55:58
What went into to your decision into how the order the dissolution of the marriage and the order of the poems?
Nathaniel Mayes
55:59
What happens when, rather than being surprised at what the form requires you to do, the first choice sounds better and has much more to say than the rhymed choice?
Laure-Anne Bosselaar
56:03
That’s the secret for writing pantoums also!
Gabriel Cleveland
57:06
Nothing wrong with having a map on the journey!
Betsy Snider
57:42
Meg - Kudos! seeing you read the book was wonderful. by
Eleanor Kedney
57:50
Thank you Meg for reading. I appreciate your answers to Cornelius' questions too. My question is about what it felt like to not have a turn in the sonnet. In free verse the turn can sometimes be a surprise and take the poem to a deeper level, so how did the surprises come in the sonnet form and did they change the course of the poem.
Molly Peacock
58:05
I so agree with Meg that you need to write the scheme down the edge of the page. But I’m amazed that you wrote the sequence backwards.
Christine Rhein
59:37
Molly, that amazes me too. I might try it!
Gabriel Cleveland
01:00:05
I would think poetic forms with repetition would really help hammer home the inevitable onslaught of climate change effectively
Laure-Anne Bosselaar
01:00:14
And let’s invent a new form! Then try to write a series in that particular form…
Christine Rhein
01:00:33
Yes, Laure-Anne!
Molly Peacock
01:00:48
Just to say a word about how the sonnet responds to social and political needs. Turmoil provokes the sonnet, from the breakup of the former Yugoslavia (where suddenly the sonnet rose to prominence in Slovenia) to the breakup of a marriage.
Ellen Austin-Li
01:01:05
I may get attacked for asking this, but what is your opinion on non-rhyming sonnets(breaking the form)
Laure-Anne Bosselaar
01:01:54
There are forms that few “see” — like the decasyllabic lined poems...
Ellen Austin-Li
01:02:06
^^Nevermind! She just answered!
Carol Owens Campbell
01:02:59
There is something so comforting to read a final line in one sonnet and reading it again at the beginning of the next sonnet. It’s a resonance I find enchanting. Thank you, Meg. You are always teaching me!
Betsy Snider
01:03:11
sestinas also work really well as a marvelous form to work through complicated subject matter.
Iain Pollock
01:05:46
To switch gears to content, can you talk a bit about how you arrived at the metaphor of the ice storm with its duality of menace and fragility?
Carol Owens Campbell
01:06:26
The book trailer is magnificent. Cheers to Gabriel for his artistry too.
Christine Rhein
01:06:28
It is indeed a beautiful book. I will revisit it often.
Laure-Anne Bosselaar
01:07:40
I also saw the ashes of 9/11 being like the snow falling in NH!
Megan Leduke
01:08:23
Here here!
Megan Leduke
01:08:27
Congratulations!
Rhett Trull
01:08:28
I had to stop to put the girls to bed, but I left my phone making a video of the screen so I'm going to watch it now. I lov eyou, Meg-guh
Megan Leduke
01:08:37
Thank you, Meg
Kevin McLellan
01:09:02
Thank you, Meg, Cornelius, and Christopher!!!
Faye Snider
01:09:03
Such an enormous pleasure to hear your read this magnificent work! Onward, dear friend.
Gabriel Cleveland
01:09:13
Thank you so much! I look forward to adding this to my bookshelf!
Megan Leduke
01:09:38
Thank you Christopher and Cornelius! So wonderful
Rebecca Connors
01:09:39
this virtual reading was great -- well run!
Rebecca Connors
01:09:42
thank you congrats!
Ken Jones
01:09:47
Thanks to Meg, Cornelius, and Christopher! Congrats on the new book!
Iain Pollock
01:09:48
Beautiful work, Meg!
Beth Williams
01:09:50
This was fantastic!
Iain Pollock
01:09:57
Great to see you, Cornelius!
Gabriel Cleveland
01:10:22
I always linger on these as people gradually disappear
Nathaniel Mayes
01:10:25
Can we get a list of those who were on this c hat if they agree to it: ?
Nathaniel Mayes
01:10:49
Enjy
Nathaniel Mayes
01:11:02
Enjoyed this a lot..and. you. A lot..thanks
Gabriel Cleveland
01:11:34
I see I'm not the only one ;P
Gabriel Cleveland
01:11:38
Take care!
Richard Carr
01:11:49
That was phenomenal
janet orourke
01:12:07
Thanks Meg !